Drug Rehab and Substance Abuse Treatment

Drug addiction is a complex disorder but there are treatment options available that can help people overcome the powerful effects of addiction on the brain. Overcoming a substance abuse disorder will typically require treatment through multiple stages of care and rehabilitation – often accompanied with pharmacological support if necessary. The most appropriate form of treatment will depend on the patients drug use history, physical condition, social environment, and any co-occurring disorders that may be present. An assessment from an addiction professional will allow them to gain an understanding of your specific needs as an individual, and create the conditions in which a treatment plan can be initiated.

 

Treating Drug Addiction

Detoxification and Medically Managed Withdrawal

The process of detoxification allows the body to clear itself of chemicals; it is the first stage of treatment to manage the acute physical and psychological effects of stopping drug use. The withdrawal stage is often accompanied by unpleasant side effects that may be dangerous if not managed in a controlled environment under the supervision of medical professionals. The detoxification process will usually be supported with medication to ease the psychological effects associated with withdrawal and to limit the shock to the body following sustained periods of substance misuse. A successful detoxification will then be followed by an appropriate drug addiction treatment programme.

 

Inpatient Drug RehabInpatient-Rehab-Programs

Residential treatment provides care 24 hours a day, generally in a non-hospital setting. Treatment can be individualised to treat those with special requirements and is structured to include activities designed to help residents examine destructive patterns of behaviour. It provides intensive treatment where patients are encouraged to adopt more harmonious and constructive behaviours in order the maintain abstinence.

Outpatient Drug Rehab

Outpatient care comes in numerous forms with varying levels of intensity. Although generally regarded to be less effective than inpatient care, there are circumstances when outpatient treatment may be deemed more appropriate. Outpatient rehab is particularly suited to those who have extensive social support from family and friends, or where time constraints limit the ability to enter a residential rehab centre for an extended period. An assessment by an addiction specialist can help the determine to severity of the addiction and whether an outpatient treatment model would be a suitable option.

Individual-Drug-Counselling

 

Individual Drug Counselling

Counselling focuses on stopping or reducing drug use and finding solutions to destructive behaviours and unhealthy relationships with those around you. It will facilitate a structure for a recovery programme with an emphasis on short-term goals and strategies designed to change patterns of behaviour. There are numerous approaches taken by addiction counsellors in order to help an addicted person to achieve their goals, but common approaches include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and 12-step participation. A qualified addiction counsellor may also refer patients to supplemental services for medical, psychiatric and therapeutic care.

 

Group-Therapy-for-AddictionGroup Counselling

Group therapy can be an effective way to help promote a drug free lifestyle, and is usually incorporated into most forms of addiction treatment. The social reinforcement offered in such a setting, especially when combined with other individualised forms of care can significantly increase the chances of long-term recovery. Group counselling and self-help groups like Narcotics Anonymous (NA) may also form part of an aftercare and recovery plan following completion of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. There are many self-help groups that are free to use and offer a convenient way of maintaining positive behaviours during recovery.

 

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